Archives: Press Release

Local people to be consulted on plans for gas-fired power station

The proposed Open Cycle Gas Turbine (OCGT) power station would produce up to 299 MW of electricity, enough to power the equivalent of about 150,000 homes.

It is intended to be able to be up and running quickly to provide back-up power to the National Grid during periods of peak demand, to support the growing number of renewable and low carbon energy sources.

As a rapid response and flexible power station it would not be operational all the time – it would be producing power for up to a maximum of 2,250 hours in a given year.

The development will contribute millions of pounds of investment into the local economy, create up to 15 full time skilled jobs once operational, and up to 150 jobs during the two-year construction period.

Local people were originally consulted on proposals for the power station in 2014, but the project was put on hold in 2015 due to market uncertainty. The project is now under the new ownership of the British energy company, Drax Group plc, and is once again being taken forward.

Andy Koss, Drax Power CEO, said: “As a result of what was learned during the consultation undertaken in 2014 and other studies, we have made a number of changes to the original proposals. For example, the cable for the electrical connection has been put underground instead of having an overhead line; we have selected an access route from the B4489 to the west of the site, and reduced the number of stacks from five to one.

“We are looking forward to sharing our latest plans at the public exhibitions next month and hearing what local people think about them before we finalise the scheme and submit a Development Consent Order application.”

Abergelli Power Limited is holding public consultation events from 7 February 2018 to 10 February 2018 at Lllangyfelach, Clydach, Tircoed and Felindre. Members of the project team will be on hand to discuss the proposals and consultation process.

The consultation will run from 16 January 2018 until 19 February 2018 and full information about the project, the public exhibitions and the preliminary findings of the environmental impact assessments will be available online on Abergelli Power here.

As the capacity of the power station is over 50 MW, the scheme is classified as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project, which means a Development Consent Order application will need to be submitted to the UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, who will make a decision on whether to give the plans the go ahead.

Subject to the public consultation, planning process and market conditions, the power station could be operational in 2022.

ENDS

For further information please contact Clare Jones on 07793382021 or email [email protected]

Notes to the Editor:

About Drax

Drax Group plc plays a vital role in helping change the way energy is generated, supplied and used as the UK moves to a low carbon future. Its 2,300-strong staff operate across three principal areas of activity – electricity generation, electricity sales to business customers and compressed wood pellet production.

The Group includes:

Drax Power Ltd, which operates the largest power station in the UK, based at Selby, North Yorkshire and supplies 7 percent of the country’s electricity needs. The energy firm converted from burning coal to become a predominantly biomass-fuelled electricity generator. Drax is the biggest single site renewable generator in the UK and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.

Haven Power, based in Ipswich, provides businesses with electricity.

Opus Energy, based in Oxford, Northampton and Cardiff, provides electricity and gas to businesses.

Drax Biomass, is based in the US and manufactures compressed wood pellets produced from sustainably managed working forests.

For more information visit www.drax.com/uk

About the Project

Further information about the Development Consent Order application process can be viewed on the Planning Inspectorate’s website at https://infrastructure.planninginspectorate.gov.uk/.

Dates of public exhibitions

  • 7th February 2018: 16.00 – 19.00 at Llangyfelach Church Hall, Swansea Road, Llangyfelach, Swansea SA5 7JA
  • 8th February 2018: 15.30 – 18.30 at Forge Fach Resource Centre, Hebron Road, Clydach, Swansea SA6 5EJ
  • 9th February 2018: 17.00 – 20.00 at Tircoed Village Hall, Y Cyswllt, Tircoed SA4 9QZ
  • 10th February 2018: 10.00 – 13.00 at Felindre Welfare Hall, Felindre, Swansea SA5 7NA

Great Britain’s lowest carbon Christmas

Decorative retro garland on silver christmas tree branch with wooden star against blue background

Great Britain’s fairy lights and roasted turkeys were powered by the cleanest electricity mix ever on Christmas day 2017 – rounding off a record breaking year for power generation in Britain.

According to analysis of Electric Insights data by researchers at Imperial College London, in collaboration with Drax, 2017 is on course to be the cleanest year for electricity generation.

Carbon emissions from power generation were just 142g/kWh on Christmas Day – more than 10% lower than on December 25 2016.

Gas generators provided over 30% of the required capacity and coal provided just 1.4% on Christmas Day – compared to 17.9% for gas and 7.1% for coal in 2016.

Roasted turkeys were powered by the greenest electricity mix ever in 2017

Dr Iain Staffell of Imperial College London said: “This was achieved in spite of generation from renewables being lower than on Christmas Day last year; mainly due to the continued reduction in coal over this year, being swapped for gas power stations.”

The low carbon Christmas comes after a whole host of renewables records were broken throughout the year and with much less coal on the system, helping to reduce Britain’s carbon emissions by around half of what they were five years ago.

Dr Staffell explained: “The carbon intensity of Britain’s electricity halved between 2012 and 2016 and we think that by New Year the 2017 figure will be at least another 10% lower than last year’s record. This means the average British household produced 100 kg less CO2 this year than they did last year without having to lift a finger, all the changes are being made ‘behind the scenes’.”

Electric Insights data also shows that January 17 2017 was the ‘dirtiest’ day of the year, with carbon intensity reaching 398g CO2/kWh. Despite this, Britain’s carbon emissions have fallen sharply as renewables records were broken throughout the year.

Dr Staffell said: “Several real milestones were reached by renewable electricity throughout 2017 – we set a new record in March for renewable generation, which was then broken again in June.

“It helped that wind speeds were relatively high during the year, so wind farm output was up by around one third compared to last year. Also, electricity demand was a little lower, meaning that renewable output formed a bigger part of the mix.”

The records broken throughout the year include:

  • February was a record breaking month for biomass with 2.1GW produced from biomass generation
  • A new record for wind, solar, hydro and biomass power was made in the first three months of 2017, with 23.2% of Britain’s power coming from these technologies over the first quarter.
  • However, this record was then broken again in the next three months, with almost a quarter of the UK’s electricity between April and June being generated sustainably – wind, solar, hydro and biomass accounted for 24.9% of the UK’s energy mix.
  • No coal was used in power stations for the first time in more than 130 years on April 22nd Dr Iain Staffell of Imperial College London added: “This was a huge milestone: the first day in which no electricity came from coal since the first steam-driven power station opened in the 1880s.”
  • On 26th May, a new solar record was made, with 3.1GW of energy produced throughout the day from solar – almost triple the yearly average of 1.2GW per day. Dr Staffell said: “A great deal of new solar has been installed on the system which meant that the previous record was smashed.”
  • June was the cleanest month of the year, with 188g per kwh of carbon emitted, compared to 339g per kwh in January – the dirtiest month. Dr Staffell, said: “This is due to demand being lower, so we could make do with very little coal generation, and gas was much lower too.”
  • 8th December saw a new record for wind energy, with 11.6GW of electricity from wind power produced over the day. Dr Staffell explained: “As with solar electricity, new capacity made it easy for the previous wind power record to be broken. 2017 was also a very windy year compared to 2016.”
  • Interconnectors also had a record-breaking year, with the link to France reaching new highs for both imports and exports. 26th March saw 1,994MW imported into Britain from France, while conversely 16th November saw 2,020MW exported from Britain to France.

Andy Koss, Drax Power CEO said: “Britain’s energy system is rapidly changing, as the Carbon Price Floor continues to force coal off the system and gas and renewables play an increasingly important role in helping to reduce carbon emissions – all year round.

“At Drax we have upgraded half of the power station to run on flexible, reliable, sustainable biomass. Around 70% of the power we produce is now renewable – enough for four million households.

“We are also looking at repowering two of our remaining coal generating units with gas to provide up to 3.6GW of power and developing up to 200MW of battery storage.

“With the four rapid response gas power stations we are developing, which will help to support the system and enable more renewables onto the grid, here at Drax we are playing an important part in helping to change the way energy is generated, supplied and used for a better future.”

ENDS

 

Media contacts:

Ali Lewis

Drax Group Head of Media Relations

E: [email protected]

T: 01757 612165

 

Editor’s notes

Data from Electric Insights comparing demand, emissions and generation on Christmas day in 2016 and 2017 – these are averages of both Christmas Days not totals:

Christmas Day 2016Christmas Day 2017
Demand (GW)29.529
Emissions (g/KWh)160142
Temperature (Celsius)10.29.7
Coal (GW)2.10.4
Gas (GW)5.38.8
Solar (GW)0.20.1
Wind (GW)9.48.4
Hydro (GW)0.80.7
Imports and storage (GW)1.82.9
Biomass (GW)20.8
Nuclear (GW)8.47.7

Previous analysis of data from Electric Insights revealed that four years ago, Britain sat in the middle of the ‘Low Carbon Electricity League’. Britain now ranks 7th in the world, following a 47% drop in emissions last year.

Electricity generation in the UK is playing a vital role in the reduction of carbon emissions, enabling other sectors like transport to become greener. Fewer fossil fuels on the system means electric vehicles are greener than ever before .

The electricity sector has many accounting conventions to be aware of. Power flow is measured in gigawatts (GW), volumes of energy are measured in megawatt-hours (MWh). Producing 1 GW constantly for an hour would give 1 GWh = 1000 MWh. Producing 1 GW constantly for a year would give 8760 GWh, which is enough to power 2.65 million homes.

About Electric Insights

  • Electric Insights Quarterly was commissioned by Drax and is delivered independently by a team of academics from Imperial College London, facilitated by the College’s consultancy company – Imperial Consultants. The reports analyse raw data that is made publicly available by National Grid and Elexon, which run the electricity and balancing market respectively. Released four times a year, the reports focus on supply and demand, prices, emissions, the performance of the various generation technologies and the network that connects them.
  • Along with Dr Iain Staffell, the team from Imperial included Professors Richard Green and Tim Green, experts in energy economics and electrical engineering, and Dr Rob Gross who contributed expertise in energy policy. The work to date has revealed scope for further research in this area, to inform both government and organisations within the energy industry.
  • The quarterly reports are backed by an interactive website electricinsights.co.uk which provides live data from 2009 until the present. It was designed by The Economist Group’s independent data design agency, Signal Noise.
  • Total emissions are calculated from British electricity consumption in tonnes per hour (including emissions from imported power), and the ‘carbon intensity’ of electricity – total emissions divided by total demand in grams per kilowatt hour (g/kWh).

About Drax

Drax Group plc plays a vital role in helping change the way energy is generated, supplied and used as the UK moves to a low carbon future. Its 2,300-strong staff operate across three principal areas of activity – electricity generation, electricity sales to business customers and compressed wood pellet production.

The Group includes:

Drax Power Ltd, which operates the largest power station in the UK, based at Selby, North Yorkshire and supplies 7 percent of the country’s electricity needs. The energy firm converted from burning coal to become a predominantly biomass-fuelled electricity generator. Drax is the biggest single site renewable generator in the UK and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.

Haven Power, based in Ipswich, provides businesses with electricity.

Opus Energy, based in Oxford, Northampton and Cardiff, provides electricity and gas to businesses.

Drax Biomass, is based in the US and manufactures compressed wood pellets produced from sustainably managed working forests.

For more information visit www.drax.com/uk

Millbrook Power’s application for Development Consent Order accepted for examination

The application had been submitted on 23rd October 2017.

The application is for development consent to construct, operate and maintain a gas fired peaking power generation plant of up to 299 Megawatts (MW) and associated electrical and gas connections on land at the former clay extraction pit, Rookery South, near Stewartby in Bedfordshire.

A copy of the application form and its accompanying documents, plans and maps (including the draft DCO and the Environmental Statement) are available until Friday 19th January 2018 for inspection free of charge at the following places:

  • Marston Vale Forest Centre
    Station Road, Marston Moretaine, Bedford, MK43 0PR
  • Central Bedfordshire Council Office
    Priory House, Monks Walk, Chicksands, Shefford, Bedfordshire, SG17 5TQ
  • Bedford Borough Council’s Customer Service Centre
    2 Horne Lane, Bedford, MK40 1RA

The application form and its accompanying documents, plans and maps are also available to view online through the Planning Inspectorate’s website and on a dedicated page of the Millbrook Power website.

Organisations and/or individuals who wish to register a representation and interest in the examination process that will take place next year (the details and dates of the examination process have yet to be confirmed) can do so via the Planning Inspectorate’s website, giving notice of any interest in, or objection to, the application.

Please note that representations or responses must be received by the Planning Inspectorate by 11.59pm on Friday 19thJanuary 2018. All representations will be made public by the Planning Inspectorate.

A formal notice explaining that the project has been accepted for examination, where the application documents can be inspected and how people can make a representation has been published in local and national newspapers and placed at various locations around the Site. This notice complies with Section 56 of the Planning Act 2008 and a copy of the notice can be found in the documents section of this website.

Further information on the application can be obtained by visiting https://www.drax.com/uk/about-us/our-projects/millbrook-power/ or by contacting Millbrook Power on 0131 550 3380 or via [email protected].

Drax Group CEO Dorothy Thompson responds to Industrial Strategy White Paper

Dorothy Thompson, Drax Group CEO said:

“Cleaner economic growth is one of the greatest industrial opportunities of our time – with the UK’s clean economy predicted to grow at four times the rate of GDP.

“Reducing carbon in electricity generation is the fastest way to reduce emissions and ensure our economy is clean and strong. Electric cars, AI and automation all depend on a flexible, secure electricity system, which sustainable biomass and rapid response gas power stations can support.

“At Drax we are already helping growing businesses be more sustainable – the proportion of businesses choosing to use renewable electricity supplied by Haven Power, part of Drax Group, has more than tripled this year, reducing their carbon emissions by 76% compared to five years ago and saving the UK almost 1.5 million tonnes of carbon.”

Drax Power CEO Andy Koss comments on Industrial Strategy White Paper

Andy Koss, Drax Power CEO said:

“The Industrial Strategy highlights that there is a technological revolution underway which will be powered by electricity.

“The Northern Powerhouse region is well placed to lead the clean energy revolution, because it has the expertise, knowledge, skills and infrastructure to deliver clean growth based on decades of powering the rest of the country.

“Creating bespoke regional industrial strategies which can draw on skills and strengths available in areas like the north, will help us to maximise the opportunities and deliver real growth.

“The Northern Powerhouse region has been leading the way in new technologies such as bioenergy, offshore wind and nuclear power, and Drax alone generated £577 million for the Northern Powerhouse regional economy, supporting more than 6,000 jobs in the region in 2016.”

Drax Group CEO Dorothy Thompson responds to Chancellor Philip Hammond’s Budget

Dorothy Thompson Drax Group CEO said:

“Having this clarity from the Chancellor on the Carbon Price Floor will help to unlock further investment in low-carbon and renewable technologies ensuring that, together, we can continue creating a cleaner economy for future generations.

“Reducing carbon in our energy system is the fastest way to deliver a low-carbon economy. The carbon price floor has enabled the UK to half the amount of carbon emitted through electricity generation since 2012. The support for Electric Vehicles in the Budget demonstrates how vital low carbon electricity generation is for growth in other sectors of the economy.

“At Drax, we will now continue to explore new ways of converting our remaining coal generating units to biomass and gas, and build new rapid response gas plants. These moves will help take coal off the system quickly and cost effectively, while maintaining security of supply and increasing our ability to provide flexible services to the grid.”

Britain enters top ten low carbon power league

  • Britain’s electricity is now the 7th cleanest, climbing 13 places in the global rankings
  • Carbon price floor has driven unparalleled CO2 reductions: Britain’s emissions from electricity almost halved (47%) between 2012-16
  • Based on the findings, Drax calls on Chancellor to maintain carbon price in Budget

Britain’s electricity is now amongst the cleanest in the world – having moved 13 places up the global rankings to be placed 7th in terms of the carbon content of its electricity among large and industrialised countries.

According to the latest Electric Insights report, produced by researchers at Imperial College London in collaboration with Drax, Britain’s shift was the biggest for any country in the league table. The most any other country moved was eight places, and this was by the Netherlands, in the opposite direction – down the leaders’ table.

The analysis shows that the UK’s carbon price has helped deliver unparalleled carbon reductions – its charge on greenhouse gas emissions has driven uptake in renewables and a shift away from coal to gas-fired power generation.

Dr Iain Staffell, from Imperial College London explained: “Since we started Electric Insights a year ago we have seen a number of ‘firsts’ across the power sector and this quarter is no different – Britain has entered the world’s top ten low carbon power league for the first time.

“Britain is reducing its carbon emissions from electricity faster than any other major country, and this has happened because the carbon price and lower gas prices have forced coal off the system – the amount of coal-fired power generation in Britain has fallen 80% between 2012 and 2016.  In the Netherlands, coal-fired electricity output has risen 40% over the same period as generators only have to pay the much lower European carbon price.”

The carbon price floor is set by the UK Government. Power generators in the UK are charged £23 per tonne of carbon dioxide (CO2) produced, compared to £5 per tonne in Europe. The six countries with lower carbon electricity than Britain benefit from substantial hydropower resources or, in the case of France, a heavy reliance on nuclear.

Andy Koss, Drax Power CEO said: “The analysis by Dr Staffell and the team at Imperial College London shows quite clearly the impact Britain’s carbon price has had in terms of helping to ensure we produce cleaner power for the UK’s homes and businesses.

“It’s therefore vital that we maintain a meaningful carbon price when the Chancellor announces the Autumn Budget, if we are to meet our commitments on climate change. Without it we could see a reversal of the impressive results achieved so far – look at what’s happened elsewhere.”

Britain’s carbon emissions from electricity almost halved (47%) between 2012-16, and the carbon impact of Britain’s electricity has fallen more than twice as fast as any other major economy.

New coal power stations were built in the Netherlands between 2013 and 2016, leading to a dramatic increase in their coal consumption and carbon emissions.

Drax has upgraded half of its power station in North Yorkshire to use sustainable biomass, transforming it to become the biggest single site renewable generator in the UK and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.

The report has been shared with HM Treasury as further evidence to support carbon pricing ahead of the Autumn Budget on 22 November 2017.

Country comparisons

 Norway, Sweden and France have the cleanest power systems among large and industrialised countries due to their mountainous terrain allowing for substantial hydropower resources and a heavy reliance on nuclear in France, with 58 reactors.

India and South Africa have the dirtiest power sectors on the list, with 75-90% of their power generated by coal.

Figure 1 Local carbon electricity league table – risers, fallers and non-movers between 2012-6

RisersFallersNon-movers
Britain up 13 placesNetherlands down eight placesNorway, Sweden and France remain at the top of the table
Ukraine and Iran both moved up three placesArgentina and Egypt are both down three placesMexico remains 14th
Korea and Australia are both up two placesVietnam, UAE and Indonesia are all down two placesUSA remains 16th
Malaysia remains 27th China remains 28th
Poland remains 30th
India remains 32nd
South Africa remains 33rd

ENDS

 

Media contacts:

Ali Lewis

Drax Group Head of Media Relations

E: [email protected]

T: 01757 612165

 

Jessica Gorton

Drax Group Press Officer

E: [email protected]

T: 01757 612848

 

Editor’s notes 

Top ten cleanest electricity systems in 2016 (grams of carbon per kilowatt hour of electricity produced) and their carbon reduction rate since 2012:

Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drax Repower: Chance to give views on gas and battery project

Artist's impression of Drax Power Station CCGT

Drax gave notice to the Planning Inspectorate in September about its intention to consult on the proposals, which are part of its strategy to play a vital role in changing the way energy is generated as the UK moves to a low carbon future.

The ongoing research and development project is exploring options including up to 3.6 gigawatts (GW) of new gas generation capacity and 200MW of battery storage in line with government plans to phase out coal by 2025.

The power station near Selby is already the UK’s largest single site renewable power generator having converted three coal generating units to use sustainable wood pellets. More than two thirds of the power produced is now renewable, providing 17% of the UK’s renewable electricity – enough for four million homes.

The upgrades would enhance Drax Power Station’s flexible and responsive capability, and make Yorkshire the home of large scale battery technology.

Andy Koss, CEO of Drax Power, said:

“We have always supported and worked with our local communities and want to ensure they have a role in shaping our thinking for the future. Drax Power Station is a national asset and a significant driver of economic growth in the North of England.

“These options could repurpose up to two of our coal assets and extend their operation into the 2030s, securing the future of the plant beyond 2025 when the government says coal must come off the system.

“We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of consultation over the coming months to share our ideas with the public and listen to their views.”

Public consultation events will give people the opportunity to find out more about the plans. Events will take place at:

Wednesday 8 November, 4pm to 8pm
Selby Town Hall, York St, Selby YO8 4AJ

Thursday 9 November, 11am to 4.30pm
Drax Sports and Social Club, The Blue Room, Main Rd, Drax, Selby YO8 8PJ

Saturday 11 November, 10.30am to 1.30pm
Junction, Paradise Place, Goole DN14 5DL

The options for repowering to gas and building battery storage complement Drax’s ongoing work to explore options for further generation from sustainable biomass.

Mr Koss added: “This is the start of the planning process but if developed these options for gas and battery storage show how we could upgrade our existing infrastructure to provide capacity, stability and essential grid services, as we do with biomass.

“This would continue to keep costs low for consumers and help to deliver the government’s commitment to remove coal from the UK grid.”

The project includes the following elements:

  • Up to 3.6 GW of new gas generation capacity and up to 200MW of battery storage. The capacity of the coal units being replaced is 1.3GW.
  • The gas generation plant will include up to four new combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs).
  • A new gas pipeline connection to the National Gas Transmission System and an electrical connection into Drax’s existing substation to allow electricity to be exported to the National Grid.
  • A temporary crane positioned next to the existing jetty on the River Ouse and at a point close to the power station during construction.
  • Environmental assessments will consider issues such as local planning, air and water quality, flood risk, traffic and transport, noise, ecology, heritage and the effects on landscape and visual amenity.

Subject to development consent being granted and construction going ahead, the Drax Repower project (gas generating plants, battery storage and gas pipeline) could be operational in 2023/24.

Further information about the project, the consultation and planning application will be published here

– Ends –

Media contacts:

Ali Lewis
Head of News
Drax Group
01757 612165
[email protected]

Jessica Gorton
Press Officer
Drax Group
07712 677177
[email protected] 

Notes to editors

About the planning regime

The proposed development is a nationally significant infrastructure project (NSIP) under “the construction or extension of a generating station” category in Part 3 Sections 14(1)(a) and 15(2) of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended). As such, Drax is required to seek planning permission known as a Development Consent Order (DCO) from the Planning Inspectorate: an executive agency of the government that manages nationally significant infrastructure projects. 

About Drax Group

Drax Group plc plays a vital role in helping change the way energy is generated, supplied and used as the UK moves to a low carbon future. Drax operates the largest power station in the UK, based at Selby, North Yorkshire and supplies 7 percent of the country’s electricity needs. The energy firm converted from burning coal to become a predominantly biomass-fuelled electricity generator. Drax is the biggest single site renewable generator in the UK and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.  Its 2,300-strong staff operate across three principal areas of activity – electricity generation, electricity sales to business customers and compressed wood pellet production.

The Group includes:

Drax Biomass, based in the US and manufactures compressed wood pellets produced from sustainably managed working forests.

Haven Power, based in Ipswich, providing businesses with electricity.

Opus Energy, based in Oxford, Northampton and Cardiff, providing electricity and gas to businesses.

For more information visit www.drax.com/uk

Drax Repower: Chance to give views on gas and battery project

People can find out more about Drax Power Station’s plans to upgrade up to two of its coal-fired electricity generating units to gas at events taking place next month.

Drax gave notice to the Planning Inspectorate in September about its intention to consult on the proposals, which are part of its strategy to play a vital role in changing the way energy is generated as the UK moves to a low carbon future.

The ongoing research and development project is exploring options including up to 3.6 gigawatts (GW) of new gas generation capacity and 200MW of battery storage in line with government plans to phase out coal by 2025.

The power station near Selby is already the UK’s largest single site renewable power generator having converted three coal generating units to use sustainable wood pellets. More than two thirds of the power produced is now renewable, providing 17% of the UK’s renewable electricity – enough for four million homes.

The upgrades would enhance Drax Power Station’s flexible and responsive capability, and make Yorkshire the home of large scale battery technology.

Andy Koss, CEO of Drax Power, said:

“We have always supported and worked with our local communities and want to ensure they have a role in shaping our thinking for the future. Drax Power Station is a national asset and a significant driver of economic growth in the North of England.

“These options could repurpose up to two of our coal assets and extend their operation into the 2030s, securing the future of the plant beyond 2025 when the government says coal must come off the system.

“We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of consultation over the coming months to share our ideas with the public and listen to their views.”

Public consultation events will give people the opportunity to find out more about the plans. Events will take place at:

Wednesday 8 November, 4pm to 8pm
Selby Town Hall, York St, Selby YO8 4AJ

Thursday 9 November, 11am to 4.30pm
Drax Sports and Social Club, The Blue Room, Main Rd, Drax, Selby YO8 8PJ

Saturday 11 November, 10.30am to 1.30pm
Junction, Paradise Place, Goole DN14 5DL

The options for repowering to gas and building battery storage complement Drax’s ongoing work to explore options for further generation from sustainable biomass.

Mr Koss added: “This is the start of the planning process but if developed these options for gas and battery storage show how we could upgrade our existing infrastructure to provide capacity, stability and essential grid services, as we do with biomass.

“This would continue to keep costs low for consumers and help to deliver the government’s commitment to remove coal from the UK grid.”

The project includes the following elements:

  • Up to 3.6 GW of new gas generation capacity and up to 200MW of battery storage. The capacity of the coal units being replaced is 1.3GW.
  • The gas generation plant will include up to four new combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs).
  • A new gas pipeline connection to the National Gas Transmission System and an electrical connection into Drax’s existing substation to allow electricity to be exported to the National Grid.
  • A temporary crane positioned next to the existing jetty on the River Ouse and at a point close to the power station during construction.
  • Environmental assessments will consider issues such as local planning, air and water quality, flood risk, traffic and transport, noise, ecology, heritage and the effects on landscape and visual amenity.

Subject to development consent being granted and construction going ahead, the Drax Repower project (gas generating plants, battery storage and gas pipeline) could be operational in 2023/24.

Further information about the project, the consultation and planning application will be published here

– Ends –

Media contacts:

Ali Lewis
Head of News
Drax Group
01757 612165
[email protected]

Jessica Gorton
Press Officer
Drax Group
07712 677177
[email protected] 

Notes to editors

About the planning regime

The proposed development is a nationally significant infrastructure project (NSIP) under “the construction or extension of a generating station” category in Part 3 Sections 14(1)(a) and 15(2) of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended). As such, Drax is required to seek planning permission known as a Development Consent Order (DCO) from the Planning Inspectorate: an executive agency of the government that manages nationally significant infrastructure projects. 

About Drax Group

Drax Group plc plays a vital role in helping change the way energy is generated, supplied and used as the UK moves to a low carbon future. Drax operates the largest power station in the UK, based at Selby, North Yorkshire and supplies 7 percent of the country’s electricity needs. The energy firm converted from burning coal to become a predominantly biomass-fuelled electricity generator. Drax is the biggest single site renewable generator in the UK and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.  Its 2,300-strong staff operate across three principal areas of activity – electricity generation, electricity sales to business customers and compressed wood pellet production.

The Group includes:

Drax Biomass, based in the US and manufactures compressed wood pellets produced from sustainably managed working forests.

Haven Power, based in Ipswich, providing businesses with electricity.

Opus Energy, based in Oxford, Northampton and Cardiff, providing electricity and gas to businesses.

For more information visit www.drax.com/uk